Showing 1–16 of 22 results

  • Linking Client-Centered Personality Theory and Practice | Center for Studies of the Person

    Linking Client-Centered Personality Theory and Practice

    $0.00

    For this session of the Diploma in Person-Centered Supervision, we came up with the scenario of a physically self-injuring client and identified at least three possible client ‘selves’ (or ‘personal constructs’ or ‘configurations’)…

  • Brief Journey Through BAPCA | Center for Studies of the Person

    Brief Journey Through BAPCA

    $0.00

    Saturday December 4th. Picture the scene: I was travelling by rail from Southampton to the ‘Future of Psychotherapy’ meeting in London – with a background context of recent train disasters. Further – there had been an announcement just a day or two before that one of the trackside signals just outside Southampton Central was in the top ten of signals most often passed at danger

  • Client-Centered Personality Theory and Practice | Center for Studies of the Person

    Client-Centered Personality Theory and Practice

    $0.00

    For this session of the Diploma in Person-Centered Supervision, we came up with the scenario of a physically self-injuring client and identified at least three possible client ‘selves’ (or ‘personal constructs’ or ‘configurations’)

  • Client-Centered Person-Centered | Center for Studies of the Person

    Client-Centered Person-Centered

    $0.00

    I have selected and typed-up a few extracts from a counselling session conducted on Thursday 7th June 2001 in the belief that exploring issues arising from it might have value in demonstrating and illustrating my understanding of elements of client-centered philosophy and beliefs, core conditions, personality theory and therapeutic process…

  • Client Centered Therapy | Center for Studies of the Person

    Client-Centered Therapy

    $0.00

    I have selected and typed-up a few extracts from a counselling session conducted on Thursday 7th June 2001 in the belief that exploring issues arising from it might have value in demonstrating and illustrating my understanding of elements of client-centered philosophy and beliefs, core conditions, personality theory and therapeutic process…

  • Client-Centred Therapy: Conditions, Process, and Theory | Center for Studies of the Person

    Client-Centred Therapy: Conditions, Process, and Theory

    $0.00

    I have selected and typed-up a few extracts from a counselling session conducted on Thursday 7th June 2001 in the belief that exploring issues arising from it might have value in demonstrating and illustrating my understanding of elements of client-centered philosophy and beliefs, core conditions, personality theory and therapeutic process.

    I am aware that in ‘putting my practice out into the open’ like this I become open to negative and positive criticism, both of which I have, at long last, learned to welcome. For many years reluctant to ‘stage demonstration sessions’ – in the belief that modelling goes against authentic self-development. I am now offering public scrutiny of my work, my way of being with clients. I now know that the less defensive I can be about my practice – no matter how hard that may be at times – the more I can learn and become the best therapist that I am able to become.

  • Core Conditions: A Historical Perspective | Center for Studies of the Person

    Core Conditions: A Historical Perspective

    $0.00

    There are certain personal qualities which should be present if the individual is to develop into a good counselor, but there is no reason to believe that these are any more rare than the qualities which would be necessary for a good artist or a first-class aviation pilot. This is definitely true if we are talking of the client-centered type of counselling

  • Empathy Complex

    Empathy Complex

    $0.00

    We shall be taking a look at a hypothetical client who makes a hypothetical disclosure in a hypothetical therapy session, exploring how emphatic understanding relates to this hypothetical context. Although the primary focus here is on emphatic understanding, we can also make links with all of the other five necessary and sufficient conditions for client-centered therapy—they are essential and integral parts of the complex

  • From Whole to Hole | Center for Studies of the Person

    From Whole to Hole

    $0.00

    So often in therapy, therapeutic or training groups when people become distressed or despairing they speak of entering a deep, dark place within themselves. A pit. A hole. A vacuum. Very often, a deep, dark, black hole. They feel terribly alone. Scared. Bewildered, often. frightened. Hopeless and helpless. Lost.

    Very often this process of ‘entering the black hole’ or ‘going beyond the precipice’ is described as ‘falling apart’ or ‘going to pieces’. And it is way too scary a leap to take: what if I am unable to become whole again?

  • How Do You Do | Center for Studies of the Person

    How Do You Do

    $0.00

    The idea of “HOW DO YOU DO”—a snappy title, some might say, came to me with reference to both “ demarcation disputes” and the process of student-centered learning of a person-centered approach (PCA) to counselling…

    ‘Demarcation disputes’ for me was around differentiation – the efforts of many to distinguish between counselling and psychotherapy, between person-centered and other approaches to counselling. Or psychotherapy. Or… Then, too, there have been the attempts to differentiatebetween counselling and counselling skills…

  • How My Supervision Impacts Upon My Practice | Center for Studies of the Person

    How My Supervision Impacts Upon My Practice

    $0.00

    I use supervision to monitor and manage practical aspects of my client work, such as ensuring an appropriate case load with adequate time (currently three hours a month) allocated for supervision.

    In my original submission for reinstatement of my accreditation, I included (and still include) an article that illustrates how I link my way of being with clients to client-centered theory – and this is a very important aspect of supervision for me. (Incidentally, I consider my knowledge of client-centered theory to be extremely in depth, and I experienced previous supervisors as less knowledgeable. This is one reason why I really appreciate
    being in a group with Alison, as her knowledge is profound, too.)

  • Humanism | Center for Studies of the Person

    Humanism

    $0.00

    We often speak of client-centred therapy and the person-centred approach being “humanistic”. What is “humanism”? One way of approaching humanism is to look at four different ages of humanism—Ancient Greece, the Renaissance, the Age of Revolution and Modern Humanism.

  • Introduction To The Client Centered Person Centered Approach | Center for Studies of the Person

    Introduction To The Client Centered Person Centered Approach

    $0.00

    The client-centered/person-centered approach derives primarily from the work of Carl Rogers (1902-1987). Nathaniel Raskin (in partnership with Rogers) wrote: Its essentials were formulated by Carl R. Rogers in 1940. A clearly stated theory, accompanied by the introduction of verbatim transcriptions of psychotherapy, stimulated a vast amount of research on a revolutionary hypothesis: that a self-directed growth process would follow the provision and reception of a particular kind of relationship characterized by genuineness, non-judgmental caring, and empathy.

  • Myths of the Subconscious | Center for Studies of the Person

    Myths of the Subconscious

    $0.00

    My year by year experience is of trainees being skeptical when I speak of there being no such thing as the “sub-conscious”. I determined to undertake a little further research in an attempt to clarify—regrettably in some ways, this has resulted in a paper/lecture rather than an experiential, student-centered exercise.

  • On Becoming More Whole | Center for Studies of the Person

    On Becoming More Whole

    $0.00

    At our joint PCT Scotland/BAPCA 1999 Forum in Glasgow there was an ongoing community of anywhere between around fifty and in excess of two hundred people. There were workshops on offer, there were speeches. There was socializing, isolation, eating and drinking and sleeping (a little!) and…here was angst, anger, joy, boredom…There were feelings of belonging, feelings of alienation…There was sharing, there was silence (shared or disconnected)

  • PCA or not PCA | Center for Studies of the Person

    PCA or Not PCA

    $0.00

    In this address, I attempt to represent the views of many. Although having mused upon the apparently amazingly diverse views upon what is and what is not person-centered, I was prompted to begin writing by a letter sent to me, at BAPCA (the British Association for the Person-Centered Approach) by Professor Dave Mearns (from the Counselling Unit at the University of Strathclyde, dated 19th January 1998), in which the prospect of accreditation (or perhaps ‘legitimization’) through BAPCA is raised. I will then move into a cross-sample of views on what does and does not constitute a person-centered approach, and potential consequences in terms of membership inclusion and exclusion for person-centered associations.

End of content

End of content