CSP 50th Anniversary
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2018 Conference

 

PRESENTATIONS

Thursday - February 1
11AM - 12:30PM
Junahli Hunter - Steps to Humanity
Molly, protagonist in a story we’ll discuss, has a need to feel compassion for the admitted perpetrator of a brutal, torturous act - a police officer - for whom she initially feels nothing but intense repugnance. Through somewhat painful, self-reflective steps, she finally shifts her attitude -- radically. Many questions raised herein…, i.e., is it really possible to feel compassion for perpetrators of horrific acts while, at the same time, despising those acts? Is it useful or desirable to feel compassion for such individuals? If we can do so, so what? What if any purpose does it serve to recognize the humanity in others who seemingly lost sight of it in themselves? If we find ourselves feeling “empathy” for someone whom we will probably never meet – such as a subject of news accounts – and for whom we are not able to establish the accuracy, or lack thereof, of the “empathy”, is that really empathy? And regardless, could such “empathy” have value?? Some value? No value whatever?
Dan Metevier - On the Making of a Man
Psychologist William Pollock, who specializes in the psychology of men and masculinity, once said, “If we truly want men to become empathic, we need to become more empathic to men.” In this interactive presentation, we’ll do just that by exploring the source of many of the greatest challenges of our times. With empathy and compassion, we’ll open up the hard candy shells of boys, men, and the patriarchy to see what the soft insides feel like. We’ll witness the culture in which boys and men grow, swim, and often drown. We’ll explore the frustration, anger, and grief men feel as they either fail to meet the standards of the male agenda or it fails them in the end, leaving them confused, depressed, and possibly even violent. Finally, we’ll build bridges we can use to begin addressing challenges posed by the male agenda and the patriarchy.
2 - 3:30PM
William R. Miller - "Taking the Lower Place: An Evolutionary Perspective on How Motivational Interviewing Works."
In a way, the question that puzzles me most is why motivational interviewing works at all. How is it that a relatively brief person-centered conversation can trigger change in behavior that has sometimes persisted for decades? In a recent provocative article, the Australian psychologist Bill Neto proposed that “An explanation as to why and how MI influences behavior may lie in our evolutionary past.” I will discuss Neto’s new theory from evolutionary psychology, which may also hold clues to the impact of person-centered approaches more generally.
Antonio M. dos Santos - The Psychology of Politics: Healing the divide caused by political beliefs.

I destroy my enemies when I make them my friends.
— Abraham Lincoln.

What erodes the political process? What leads to a healthy political process? How can virtues (empathy, honesty, unconditional acceptance, goodness, inner strength, and more) change the political landscape and break divisions? How to elect effective, efficient and compassionate candidates? How do candidates' beliefs and values affect the political process? How does the mental process of both the candidate and the voter work? How to better understand political discourse? How does people's internal state (strength or weakness) affect the election? All this based on my book The President That We Want to be published.

Friday - February 2
11AM - 12:30PM
Patrick and Eileen Howley - Bridging Our Inner Differences
Why is it so difficult to bridge our differences? Perhaps it is necessary to commit to deep self-reflection in order to see how our own inner divisions prevent us from getting along and working together. We might discover as Krishnamurti has discussed in most of his books, that, “you are the world” This workshop, demonstration and intrapersonal encounter is designed to provide all of us with an opportunity to do more of our inner work:
  • Looking at our own biases
  • Observing our judgments, anger and resentments
  • Observing our own threats
  • Witnessing our perceptions of our inner life
  • Accepting our inner differences.
I have found that doing deep inner reflection, using a specific process to look at “how I do myself,” helps me to clear my mind, heart and soul so that I can be more present to others, even during difficult and conflicting situations. I wonder, what are my “hot buttons”, “prejudices”, “biases” and “judgments”? I reflect on my own perceptions, “uncover them”, “own them”, “wrestle with them”, and simply report them out to others, who become my non-judgmental witnesses until it becomes not so necessary for me to be so “fond of them” and more importantly not “so attached to them.” Finally, at times, I am able to release their hold on me. This session will invite you to do this inner work, trying on the process that we demonstrate. In this presentation, workshop, and encounter, Pat and his wife Eileen will share their experiences in facilitating a weekly meditation group where they integrate the work of Carl Rogers, John Weir, Krishnamurti, Ken Wilber and others.
 
We will dialogue with each other exploring spontaneously our perceptions of how we are alike and how we are different. We will then invite you to dialogue with us about you and your perceptions of you. Come to the session with a willingness to explore a new language to bridge both our inner and external differences.
Sophie Muller - The Person-Centered Approach Digital Outreach Project - Building Peace
As introduced in 2017, the Person-Centered Approach Digital Outreach Project is a necessary stepping stone to building sustainable world Peace as it means to foster congruent and empathic global citizens who approach all living things with unconditional positive regard. A year after the introduction of the project on a face-to-face basis in a Japanese university, encouraging developments are showing that by becoming familiar with the three core principles as a way of being, students shift their perception of differences from intimidating to nurturing, and develop a mindset towards open-mindedness.
 
Based on students’ reflections as well as instructor’s observations, this presentation will tell the story of how the PCA can help us bridge our differences, not just in challenging times. Resources used to introduce, reflect and discuss the three core conditions will also be shared for those interested in practical inputs.
2M - 3:30PM
Nao Kurihara, Kaede Uchida, Yukari Kurono, Sakura Kanda - Why the Person-Centered Approach Matters to Us: Stories of Significant Import
Second-year university students from Japan will share their experience with the Person-Centered Approach. They will explain what their weekly seminar on the PCA has helped them learn about themselves and others, and why they believe their peers should all be given the opportunity to experience it too. They hope that their call for spreading the PCA towards younger generations will be heard, and actions taken to make it a reality. As they like to say: "The Future is Now".
Elva Hoxie - Congruence in Counseling: How does a therapists’ personal journey effect the process?
Carl Rogers writes: "I have always been better at caring for and looking after others than I have been at caring for myself. But in the later years, I have made progress.” Therapists need to practice their own self-awareness to be an effective partner in the therapeutic process. Congruency and authenticity in addressing one’s own personal challenges involves selfcare. Practicing appropriate self-care is a practice in helping “heal the healer.” Behavioral health practitioners can experience compassion fatigue, burnout, secondary trauma, and post traumatic triggers. The outcome of practicing self-care is a way of bringing increased compassion, understanding and non-judgement to the therapeutic alliance and helps prevent barriers to effective therapy. Healing practitioners may choose the profession from their own personal challenges or will experience tragedies during their career. Selfcare exemplifies a genuine way of building personal resilience. Irving Yalom reminds us not to allow our own struggles to cause stagnation but to “keep learning about yourself in order to be effective in your own work."
    Overview –
  1. Transcending challenges and trauma exemplified in personal stories --
  2. Personal narrative – Learning to allow one’s personal experience to bring congruence to the therapeutic process
  3. Open Discussion – Sharing of how therapists practice selfcare
  4. Summary – Identifying and clarifying "how the healer heals"
Saturday - February 3
11AM - 12:30PM
Bob Lee - Widening Our Circle of Compassion
As Albert Einstein wrote, "human being experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings, as something separate from the rest: a kind of optical illusion of his consciousness. This illusion is a prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for only the few people nearest us." The ego conscious mind is an illusion, which projects and then only perceives its illusion. The illusionary self is ironically enclosed in its very own self-made illusionary prison. The Self through stopping identification with its created(small)self -- which by nature is excluding and exclusive -- decides for Awakening in the unconditional state of Mind, Whose Essence is Being. This automatically places one in the Here (Vastness), Which is but Now (Timelessness). In other words, I Am What I Am is what "I" am is looking for. True Joining is simply accepting and embracing the unconditional, already perfectly Joined –- to Be is to be unconditionally Related –- that already exists in all real Relationships.
Fontaine Laing - Balance in the Art of Teaching the Piano
The two fundamentals in teaching an art are the student and subject. In this demonstration we will witness the teacher working with skills, technique, spirit -- the needs of communicating the subject material -- and the emotions -- the needs of the new student. Observations, questions, and discussion will follow.
2 - 3:30PM
Matt White - I thought you might say that.—Using imaginary dialogues for better understanding of yourself and your perceptions of others
In this workshop, I’d like to demonstrate the use of writing imaginary dialogues as a way of helping us to better understand ourselves, recognize and acknowledge different perspectives and perceptions, and to move on to a grudging tolerance and (Who knows?) maybe even an unconditional positive regard for others with whom we are having trouble overcoming our differences. Introduction of the concept and then participants writing imaginary dialogues, reflecting on them and discussing them.
Jackie Hicks, Barbara Williams, Heather Williams, Carla Gerstein - Children's Wisdom
We intend to present and demonstrate positive ways to work with kids as we explore how differences become obstacles and that the ways we choose to view and behave around those differences create bridges or barriers to understanding and relationship. 2 Hours




 

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CSP 50th Anniversary
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